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Two items that I always travel with, especially when flying, are compression socks and compression packers. Both are entirely different things with completely different uses when it comes to travel, but both are important.

COMPRESSION is defined as “the effect, result, or consequence of being compressed” and the word COMPRESS is defined as “to press together; force into less space.”

How does “pressing together” and being “forced into less space” have to do with travel you ask? Well, read on fellow travellers…

A Tale of 2 Compressions – Socks and Packers

A new product I just discovered is the Lewis N Clark Flight Compression Sock. Made specifically to aid in the prevention of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), these unisex calf-length socks provide graduated leg compression to improve blood circulation while flying. These aren’t for use for people with venous leg issues but are for those looking for a light compression that isn’t too overly tight.

Lewis N Clark Flight Compression Socks

Black colour only
Size: small, medium, large
95% nylon, 5% spandex

I found that the socks washed well in cold water and dried quickly overnight. They were comfortable, fit well and didn’t pill over time.

I do wish that they came in more colours such as white or beige, but they only come in black.

I think these are a good buy since they are affordable and good for your health.

Note: These compression socks are intended for use with healthy legs. Discuss this product with your doctor before use.


Read these other articles about compression socks
Dr. Segal’s Compression Socks – Stir-Up Sock – Review
Keeping your Legs Healthy when Travelling with Rejuvahealth Compression Stockings
 


 
As loyal readers know, we regularly travel carry-on only and refuse to pay the extra fees associated with checked luggage.

As a result, we’ve come to rely on various packing accessories to help keep our bags organised such as packing cubes and compression packers.

Lewis N. Clark Compression Packers, 3-Pack

Small: 20in x 14in
Medium: 23in x 16in
Large: 28in x 18in

Compression Packers are perfect for conserving space at home and in your luggage by compressing bulky items such as sweaters flat.

How they work is you neatly fold your items and place them inside the bag. Seal the bag well by moving the sliding closure back and forth a few times, then position the bag on a firm surface and starting at the zipper end, roll the bag and force the air out through the one-way valves at the bottom. (I find it helpful to sit on it slowly and save some muscle power by using my weight to squeeze out the air) To reopen the bag just pull the zipper apart at the centre.

I like to use the bag size that fits my suitcase perfectly so that it will lay flat and I don’t need to fold it in half. I travel to my destination with the bag empty, and then on my way back, I put my dirty laundry inside it for the return trip. I typically only use them on the return journey home since that’s when I need more space for all the souvenirs I’ve collected.


 
Lewis N. Clark Compression Packers
 
Another reason why I only use them on the return trip back is that I find that the pure act of compressing your clothes causes wrinkles. It isn’t a huge issue if you use it for soft clothing such as sweaters or sweatshirts but for anything that isn’t wrinkle-free, using a compression bag for packing causes a tonne of wrinkles so be careful.

The bags can be easily wiped clean after use, are reusable and are budget friendly.


 
Taking Flight with Lewis N Clark Compression Socks and Compression Packers - A review by Calculated Traveller

I received a sample product for testing purposes from Lewis N. Clark. I was not financially compensated for this review. All opinions are entirely my own.
 

Do you travel with compression socks or use compression packing bags?